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U.S. Policy Options for Reducing Tropical Deforestation: What Can be Done?

External link - 3 hours 41 min ago
In a new Discussion Paper, RFF scholars propose a ?whole-of-government? approach for slowing and reversing tropical forest loss to engage the full suite of policy levers in the federal government.
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The Impact of Climate Change on the Forest Industry

External link - 3 hours 41 min ago
Resources Magazine: In a warmer world, forests will overtake tundra regions and extra carbon could boost production, according to new research.
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Why We Need Accurate Maps of the World?s Forests

External link - 3 hours 41 min ago
Resources Magazine: RFF researchers make the case for better forest maps and the space-based technologies that can make them a reality.
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Forest Tenure Reform in China

External link - 3 hours 41 min ago
Resources magazine: To boost domestic forest production and correct rural?urban income disparity, China is putting forest management rights into the hands of its citizens.
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Video - Working Towards Successful Outcomes on Post Beetle Landscapes Within Alberta. Presentation by Brooks Horne

Global Forest Information Service - Tue, 2015-07-28 22:39

Brooks Horne, senior forester for Forest Rehabilitation at Alberta Environment & Sustainable Resource Development (ESRD), discusses the forest recovery process that occurs after damage from mountain pine beetle (MPB). Even though forests will naturally recover from MPB over the course of twenty five years or more, this may not be fast enough to preserve critical ecosystem services. The ESRD MPB Rehabilitation program has created the overarching objective of continued production of ecosystem goods and services in pine dominated stands heavily impacted by MPB.

Currently there are four priority types of baseline information that need to be attained, including answering the question: how many dead trees are there, and where are they? Horne explains specific objectives, to accomplish the overarching objective, will be created after the baseline information is acquired.

This presentation was a part of the Mountain Pine Beetle Information Exchange Forum in April, 2015.

FRI Subject Area: Forest ManagementInsect InfestationsDisplay on Maps: Related Program: Mountain Pine Beetle Ecology Program
Categories: Forest

Video - Working Towards Successful Outcomes on Post Beetle Landscapes Within Alberta. Presentation by Brooks Horne

Metla Finland - Tue, 2015-07-28 22:39

Brooks Horne, senior forester for Forest Rehabilitation at Alberta Environment & Sustainable Resource Development (ESRD), discusses the forest recovery process that occurs after damage from mountain pine beetle (MPB). Even though forests will naturally recover from MPB over the course of twenty five years or more, this may not be fast enough to preserve critical ecosystem services. The ESRD MPB Rehabilitation program has created the overarching objective of continued production of ecosystem goods and services in pine dominated stands heavily impacted by MPB.

Currently there are four priority types of baseline information that need to be attained, including answering the question: how many dead trees are there, and where are they? Horne explains specific objectives, to accomplish the overarching objective, will be created after the baseline information is acquired.

This presentation was a part of the Mountain Pine Beetle Information Exchange Forum in April, 2015.

FRI Subject Area: Forest ManagementInsect InfestationsDisplay on Maps: Related Program: Mountain Pine Beetle Ecology Program
Categories: Europe

Video - Impact of Mountain Pine Beetle at the Community Level. Presentation by Richard Harpe

Global Forest Information Service - Tue, 2015-07-28 22:35

Richard Harpe, councilor for Division 8, County of Grande Prairie No. 1, sheds light on the impact of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) at the community level. This rural and agricultural community includes large and small businesses, and many families. Here, the mountain pine beetle has been both far-reaching and invasive.
MPB hit in 2006, and a control program was started shortly thereafter.

Harpe discusses the results of the program, and the socio-economic impacts of the MPB. Yearly crop loss alone is estimated to be 4 million annually, but the full impact of the MPB is yet to be determined.

This presentation was a part of the Mountain Pine Beetle Information Exchange Forum, April 2015.

FRI Subject Area: Forest ManagementInsect InfestationsDisplay on Maps: Related Program: Mountain Pine Beetle Ecology Program
Categories: Forest

Video - Impact of Mountain Pine Beetle at the Community Level. Presentation by Richard Harpe

Metla Finland - Tue, 2015-07-28 22:35

Richard Harpe, councilor for Division 8, County of Grande Prairie No. 1, sheds light on the impact of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) at the community level. This rural and agricultural community includes large and small businesses, and many families. Here, the mountain pine beetle has been both far-reaching and invasive.
MPB hit in 2006, and a control program was started shortly thereafter.

Harpe discusses the results of the program, and the socio-economic impacts of the MPB. Yearly crop loss alone is estimated to be 4 million annually, but the full impact of the MPB is yet to be determined.

This presentation was a part of the Mountain Pine Beetle Information Exchange Forum, April 2015.

FRI Subject Area: Forest ManagementInsect InfestationsDisplay on Maps: Related Program: Mountain Pine Beetle Ecology Program
Categories: Europe